alisa alering

Writer of fantasy and other fictions


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Wiscon Schedule

Two days to Wiscon!

Mini-preview of Lynda Barry drawings for the Tiptree auction

Mini-preview of Lynda Barry drawings I’m donating for the Tiptree auction

Things I’m looking forward to:

My schedule:

Novel Writers’ Workshop

Mike Underwood (mod), Marianne Kirby, Aaron Micheau, Alisa Alering

Friday 9am — ?

Everyone in my workshop is working on a YA novel. I’ve been reading the chapters, and we’ve got shape-shifters and parallel worlds, and strange and dangerous beasties. I met Mike Underwood at Wiscon last year (He’s a fellow CW alum & for a while we lived in the same town.) I heard him read from his debut novel, Geekomancy, and I think his sense of humor is right on target for the project I’m working on. Should be good fun.

How To Create When Life Isn’t Slowing Down For You

Cliff Winnig, Alex Bledsoe, Rory Metcalf, Kiini Ibura Salaam, Alisa Alering

Friday, 4:00pm — 5:15pm, Room 629

Writing the perfect novel or story is difficult while juggling a job, long-term relationships (spouses, children), and the constant interruptions that happen. However, as projects like NaNoWriMo show, it is possible to manage time effectively to create while still maintaining some semblance of life. Let’s talk about time and project management, organizing ideas, and using the dead time (waiting in lines, driving) to plan out projects.

Class in Science Fiction and Fantasy

Ian K. Hagemann, Eileen Gunn, Madeleine E. Robins, Alisa Alering

Saturday, 2:30pm — 3:45pm, Wisconsin

In speculative fiction, we create entire worlds and societies. How does SF handle social and economic class? Is there room for improvement? If so, what?

Broad Universe Rapid-Fire Reading

Sandra Ulbrich Almazan, F.J. Bergmann, Ada Milenkovic Brown, D.L. Burnett, Kater Cheek, Anna LaForge, Julia Dvorin, Heather McDougal, Katherine Mankiller, Alisa Alering

Saturday, 9:00pm — 10:15pm, Conference 2

Come hear the members of Broad Universe read from their current projects. Not sure what I’m going to read yet…

I’m also going to be volunteering for the:

Tiptree Bake Sale

Saturday, 11:30am — 5:15pm, Room 627 

“World Domination through Bake Sales!” That’s one of the slogans at Tiptree Juggernaut Headquarters. The Tiptree Award supports gender-bending SF/F, publishes, auctions, and loves chocolate chip cookies! A wide variety of cookies, breads, cakes, pies and delectables are baked and donated by Tiptree supporters.

I’ll be dishing out goodies from 11:30 – 1pm. I’m also bringing these:

SFS_GoodyGoodyBars_276613

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Poetic Interlude (AKA, Wheee! Words)

Early this morning, author Marly Youmans invited the world to take part in a word-doodling in the form of a beau présent, a poem that contains only the letters in the recipient’s name, but using one’s own name.

I’ve been spending a lot of time doing serious, logical, ferrety work with a novel outline and I couldn’t resist the invitation to play with words in a whole different way.  My name gives me a lot of vowels to wrangle, but once I started making word lists, I felt rather fond of the words I contain.

A Singing
Alisa Alering beau présent

In rag lane,
grain is grail
sail is sea

In rag lane,
I glean–
gill, gale, lens & rain
I learn–
rage, sin, rail, & gain

In rag lane,
I ran–
A girl, a sage, a sag-song gal
A leg, a leer, a rage-real nail

Learners reel,
Rings align–
Release gale!

In sea, a song.
In song, a sail.

In rage lane,
In sere rain,
I reign.


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6 Things You Might Not Know About Me

Photo: Rob Boudon, via Flickr, CC-BY 2.0

Photo: Rob Boudon, via Flickr, CC-BY 2.0

1. I can read and understand Hindi (speak, not so much) Not as well now as I did five years ago. But I can still write my name! This isn’t much of an accomplishment for someone from India, I realize, but in the US it qualifies as a “less commonly taught language.” When I sing along to my favorite filmi songs, I mostly know what I’m saying. (I regret that this knowledge does nothing for the quality of my singing).

2. Twenty years ago, an old woman in Spain thought I was a beggar and gave me money. She insisted I take it. I meant to save that coin for the rest of my life, because I felt guilty and because I didn’t really need it. I spent it a few days later.

3. One of my front teeth is completely turned around. The inside surface faces out, and what should be the front points back towards the inside of my mouth.

4. When I was in high school, I was a cheerleader. If you don’t know me, this isn’t an exciting revelation. But if you know me now, you never saw that one coming.

5. If I scratch a particular spot on my right rib, I feel a sharp twinge in my right elbow. Without fail.

6. When I was in high school, I used to work at a circus/amusement park/farm/petting zoo. I washed horses, braided manes, fed the pigs, got spat on by the llama, put the harness on the Clydesdale, and painted glitter on the unicorn’s hooves.

Daily Prompt: Far From Normal


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Clockwork Phoenix IV

I’m thrilled to announce that my story, “The Wanderer King,” will be published in Clockwork Phoenix IV, edited by Mike Allen and due out from Mythic Delirium Press in June 2013. I loved the original Clockwork Phoenix, and I am in fantastic company in this volume. I can’t wait to get my own copy and read everybody else’s stories. See the full TOC here.

CP4_mini


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Blackout Poem: The Lost City

I love the idea that stories can be found lurking in unexpected places (like they’re just hanging out, nonchalantly whistling to themselves, thinking they’re getting away with it.)

Even more, I love exercises and prompts that trick me into writing. Combine the two with the formula Newspaper + Marker = Poetry and you get a blackout poem.

Poem-hunting (imagine me in a pith helmet, carrying a Sharpie-tipped spear) was supposed to be my reward for writing a first draft of a new story on Friday, but I didn’t get to it until today, sitting at the kitchen counter keeping an eye on a pot of boiling chick peas. There are worse ways to begin a new year than with the excavation of a previously undiscovered poem.

My poem was unearthed from the bottom half of page A18 of The New York Times, Friday, December 28, 2012.

New York Times, Dec. 28, 2012

The Lost City

In a city of missed connections, consider the map:
Lines stop and hop hopelessly out of view.
Clocks steal a weekday morning,
then back up the staircase to a different city.
Without music worth following, a language comes
Like two animals slinking up the steps, doubled by the wind.

To uncover your own hidden story you will need:

–1 copy of the New York Times or other pre-printed reading material
–1 fat black marker
–1 cup of hot chocolate, coffee, or other warming beverage of your choice

If you find one, send me a link in the comments, please!


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This is Your Brain On Novel Writing

The brain on NaNoWriMo.
Courtesy National Library of Medicine

As I mentioned in some previous posts, I’ve been doing NaNoWriMo this year. As of today, I’ve written 49,119 words of my apocalyptic pony novel (yay!). It also means that I have used up all of the words in my brain (boo!). To that end, I’ve decided to let somebody else do the talking. Special guest post/interview with David Rees-Thomas, fiction editor of Waylines Magazine, coming tomorrow.


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Friday Rant

The Dog: She’s tired of this stuff, too.

This was too long for Facebook, so I guess it’s time for a bonus post.

Be warned: ranting ahead. Ranty rant rant.

I like to listen to audiobooks when I go for a walk in the afternoon. It’s been a busy month, what with all 26,000 of those NaNoWriMo words I’ve been pounding out. So yesterday when it was time to choose a new book, I decided I’d have a mystery/thriller. An intellectual Scandinavian one. Not too vapid, but with atmosphere and plenty of plot.

I chose Jo Nesbo’s, ‘The Leopard.’ I got the audiobook a while ago, but I didn’t remember the description in any detail. I just remembered it was supposed to be good.

I got out on the street with the dog and it started out with some nameless woman being victimized by some nameless ‘he’. And, you know, maybe she gets all empowered by the end. And maybe it passes the Bechdel test and a kick-ass female heroine appears and saves the day and she and the erstwhile victim go on to be smart and funny and talk about things that aren’t men. But you know what?

I don’t care. Because, I just don’t want to listen to this. I don’t want to go along with some poor woman’s mutilation and humiliation one more time. I don’t want to be horrified, or titillated through horror, or whatever you want to call it. I’m tired of that whole trope. Weary, really. So I crossed the road, I turned it off, and listened to music for the rest of my walk.

Today I’m going to listen to “Broken Kingdoms” by Nora Jemisin instead.